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American Death Metal entrepreneurs, Six Feet Under, just finished a mini tour through some North American cities. The reason for said campaign was to support their latest album, Unborn. Considered as a companion piece to their previous recording, Undead, this new studio venture sees the group navigating throughout some familiar territories. However, on both Undead and Unborn SFU also explores new sonic landscapes while during the process becoming a more technically proficient entity. Just before going on tour, iconic growler and SFU’s founder, Chris Barnes, spoke with us about the particularities of these new vicious slabs of infectious, groovy Death Metal.

We are thrilled to have teamed-up with Metal Blade Records to bring you this exclusive world premiere of the lead track off Six Feet Under’s forthcoming album Unborn. The song, titled “Neuro Osmosis”, is a thundering, runaway freight train of a tune that has the Tampa, Florida death metal band yet again doing what they do best… sonic destruction! Soon to be part of your “Top Death Metal Albums of 2013” list, get your listen on NOW!

Now I know, amongst death metal circles, it is something akin to treason, but I have be honest when I say that I’ve always found the death metal peddled by Six Feet Under to be a bit m’eh. I know, I know, it’s Chris Barnes and he was in Cannibal Corpse in a time when they redefined death metal but, I’ve never found any of his post-“Hammer Smashed Face” output in Six Feet Under to be anywhere near as potent or unrelentingly sickening.

As far as Metal music goes 2012 was one of the most interesting years in a long time. Masterful albums such as Sigh’s In Somniphobia, Ihsahn’s Eremita, Enslaved’s Riitiir, Katatonia’s Dead End Kings, among many others, kept the quality and innovative spirit on the genre at supremely high levels. Cover artworks were also a big thing. They went from being epic (Testament), to nightmarish (Sigh), and even to minimalist (Ihsahn). Most importantly though, they helped to enhance the music and general aura of each album while introducing fans to new worlds where the power of imagination seems not to have limits. Through 2012 PureGrainAudio interviewed some of the designers and musicians involved with the creation of some of these amazing cover artworks and what we learned was, as with the music itself, totally fascinating!

This is it! Unlike our mix-up last week, we present with the fourth and final episode in our And Justice For Art mini series dubbed “Metal Artists’ All-Time Favorite Album Covers”. We’re ending it with a bang and bringing you fave covers from some of Metal’s big hitters. Grab a brew (alcoholic or non) and check out what these 10 metal musicians (including members Of Lamb Of God, Enslaved, Tombs and As I Lay Dying) had to say about album artwork that left them with a lasting impression.

Welcome to the third installment of “Metal Artists’ All-Time Favorite Album Covers”. While last week we were under the impression that this would be the final part of our mini-series, we realized that we actually had enough sick content, to bring you a fourth part! So sit back and relax, ’cause you still get to do this once more! For now, read on and see what members of Attika 7, Black Tusk, Phobia and Tragedy, among others, have to say about those album covers that forever changed their lives.

Everyone, metal musicians included (unless of course you are Devin Townsend), has a favorite album cover. At some point in their lives, these musicians have fallen in love with a particular cover art that has long-since resonated with them and in some cases, even influenced their very own musical careers. Bearing this in mind, we asked a handful of metal’s leading musicians one simple question: “What’s your all-time favorite Rock/Metal album artwork and why?” Well, most of the responses were very detailed and enthusiastic, yet for some this proved to be a difficult subject. Let’s see who they were and what they said….

Even in the largely-ignored-by-mainstream-press realm of extreme metal, certain bands have gone through what major bands frequently experience: that major bitch of a lineup shakeup called LSC (Lead Singer Change). While most certainly turning the heads of self-respecting metalheads out there who are well-connected to the grapevine, even a neutral bystander who might not even necessarily be remotely interested in metal music as a whole can probably understand the huge reaction. What is contemporary music without vocals?